Cheese Zombies

Dear Yakima School District:

Your best effort ever, according to my childhood, was the Cheese Zombie.    My favorite childhood hot lunch was paired with a reconstituted, milky tomato soup. Thank you, Mom, for making sure that I had a hot lunch ticket on Cheese Zombie days.

Lunch lady.  Ordinary.  Plump.  Hair net meticulously crowned.  Drawn eyebrows.  Large chest in a below-the-knee cafeteria dress. Varicose veins above sensible shoes.  Apron.  She is white, of course.  99.5% of the people at my elementary were white.  I was barely aware that people came in an amazing array of flavors.  White kids.  White lunch ladies.  White bread.

The Cheese Zombie was steeped in delicious carby, fatty mystery.  That singular hybrid of easy starch and fat required less chewing than food ought.  Dip that Zombie into sweet, hot tomato soup.  For a few moments your childhood troubles melted away.

Worry over lessons.  Worry over playground politics.  Worry over what you might encounter on the walk home.  Worry over what would be at home once you got there.  All of it melted away in the gooey, warm, buttery sensation of a Cheese Zombie and tomato soup.

No wonder I have food issues and a love affair with Cheese Zombies.  🙂

Sincerely,

E

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Defunct Daily Prompt

No Daily Prompt.  Hmm. Feels like a friend just dropped off the face of the Earth.

A friend I neglected most days, but always expected to be there if I made an effort.

I’m nursing a pouty feel just about now.

It always boils down to economic practicalities and blah, blah, blah.

I doubt any of the DP crowd appreciates the dismissal.  Not really.  Boo, WordPress.

We liked the community.  We came to recognize and look for familiar “faces”.

There was a rhythm to DP.  Now a silence has settled.

Hat’s off to Sue and Gerry!  They are making lemonade out of lemons.  I look forward to sharing a tall, icy glass!

Photo by PhotoMIX Ltd. on Pexels.com

 

 

Damn you, Stephen King! You killed the adverb!

On Writing is written and read aloud by Stephen King. He fascinates me and I don’t want the audiobook to end.  No re-read/re-listen will have the same effect.  Not even close.  What he throws at me has one chance to stick.

King recalls his storyteller roots from A to Z without putting me to sleep.  You’ve got to be good to do that because my mind wanders with the best of them.  Bad sometimes.

Thanks to King, I now see the adverbs in storytelling.  They are everywhere. He challenges me to be judicious with adverbs, eliminating them at best.  King admits even he can’t kill all of them.

The concept is firmly planted. I heartily accept this challenge.  It will be hard to describe my way around those little these sweeties.  Writing just got a little more complicated.

Oh, and King writes for the sake of writing.  Aaahhh, just as I’d suspected.  Money and fame be damned, you couldn’t stop King from writing if you tried.  He writes because he must.  Period.  Exactly what I want from a writer! He is no lazy writer and puts in the time.  Lesson given.  Lesson received.

Thank you, Stephen King.

Press Photo Credit: Shane Leonard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Prompt:  Complication

Like: FB Turtleneck

I want more than a LIKE button and its more exuberant neighbors LOVE, ANGRY, SAD.

I’m choking over here.

LIKE that house fire?

LIKE that report on poverty figures?

Hey, can I get a simple checkmark?

Check mark says, “Hey, there.  I saw your post.  I read you.  We’re good here.”

LIKE would be a real choice then.

“Yeah.”  “Way to go.”  “Thumbs up!”

LIKE would mean something.

Acknowledgement wouldn’t necessitate alignment.

The slight difference would sit well with me.

I would LIKE it.

 

Hoarder’s Child (Rewrite)

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Wall and floor consumed in madness.

Window breaks daylight over steep heaps of God knows what.  

Child has just enough room to breathe.

Breathe child, for you can do little else.

A knock on the door strikes terror.

Climb and see. 

Aaahh. 

Potluck ladies balance casserole dishes. 

They angle for a peek inside. 

Door slightly ajar, child replies.

No, we are not moving.

No, you cannot come in.

Child knows hospitality does not live there. 

There is barely enough room for child.

What could potluck ladies bring to the mix, hmmm?

It takes practice to wear the blanket of shame.

It is heavy.